The Burgeoning Administrative State




by Bridget Geegan Blanton








The advent of the administrative state; a.k.a. the welfare state, began with the inception of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal in 1937; in spite of the fact that it was challenged for lacking Constitutional legitimacy. The original program has evolved from an economic safety net into a blank check for a far-reaching federal government.

Left behind in the wake of an emboldened tax and spend government, are social consequences such as undermined personal responsibility and a debilitating dependence on welfare that spans generations. Although the welfare state is firmly entrenched, it is never too late to question the appropriate limits of power.

It did not take long for a single unconstitutional decision to evolve into an imbedded socialistic system of redistribution. Early on, the institution of federal grants and social policies went far beyond the initial vision of temporary financial support. As the bureaucracy increased in size and power, the gap increased between Constitutional legitimacy and the administrative state. As the distance grew, so did the rise of improper delegation of power to public officials.

Within the gargantuan welfare bureaucracy, unelected public officials advise branches of government who in turn 'rubberstamp' their findings without proper review. This practice affects how income taxes are assessed, collected and used to finance the welfare state. Although there must always be a safety net for individuals who cannot care for themselves, the institutionalized system of welfare includes handing out benefits to recipients who are not citizens of this country.

Therein lies the problem of the welfare state. In spite of ever increasing rates of taxation, the system will eventually collapse. Fiscal seizure in the form of onerous taxation cannot sustain the ever-increasing rate of growth.

The Framers of the Constitution sought to limit the power of government; yet, today the federal government exercises power not found in the Constitution. Decades ago, when Fidel Castro nationalized private property in Cuba, Americans were appalled.

Today, we see incident after incident of private property seizure by the government in the name of 'smart growth'. For the victim, this seizure is considered theft and nothing more. In less than one hundred years, the American populace has left behind concepts of hard work and personal responsibility for a belief in having a 'right' to welfare services provided by the state. Socialist regimes around the globe have already illustrated the fact that the concept of welfare 'rights' eventually erodes to the level of utter demand.

Politicians caught on quickly to the equation that campaign promises translate into votes. The upcoming presidential election has already witnessed welfare state promises from candidates vowing to nationalize healthcare in exchange for power. Beware of strangers bearing gifts. One thing remains true - there's no such thing as a free lunch. Oppressive taxation and loss of individual liberty is the price each of us will have to pay.

Before you hand over the keys of your own personal welfare, and cast a vote in favor of inefficient, unaccountable and wasteful government, take a good hard look at systems of socialized medicine outside of this country. You'll discover a draconian health care system that is characterized by long waits, supply shortages and over-worked, hostile doctors and support staff. It's not a solution; it's a socialist regime.

There is no sound justification for the allowing the welfare state to gain power and influence, in face of the social consequences. The 'nanny state' creates dependent people who have no understanding of economics. Personal responsibility is replaced with welfare logic. We must never lose sight of the fact that the United States is an incredible place in a world overrun with totalitarian regimes. Our Constitutional form of government must not be replaced with an all-powerful centralized government.

Never forget that it is in the self-interest of the bureaucrat and the politician who control the welfare state, to encourage ever-increasing dependency. Prior to the New Deal, Americans accepted responsibility for their own welfare; and it often required hard work. Compassion for those in need created charities that helped people regain their dignity or direction in life. Americans need to recover the principles that founded this great nation instead of handing over their destiny to the discretion of an elite power base whose own self-interest will always trump the consent of the governed.






Whispers on the Wind




by Bridget Geegan Blanton







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